Mass Times & Mission

Sunday 8 am Matins and Mass

Sunday 10 am Sung Mass (Sunday School following for all ages)

Thursdays 12 Noon Mass

Holy Days as Announced in Parish Newsletter or on Facebook

Confessions heard Saturday evenings especially and by Appointment

Got Questions? We’ve got answers! See below…

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Some churches near us believe strongly that congregations should serve the Lord’s Supper or Holy Communion every Sunday as in the Primitive or early Church.

We agree! Consistent with what we understand in Scripture (Acts 2:42-47), the Anglican Catholic Church requires the main service every Sunday to be that of Holy Communion, whenever possible. Called by many names, Divine Liturgy or Service, Holy Eucharist or Thanksgiving, or Holy Mass, that worship with bread and wine commemorating Christ’s Death until He comes again (1 Cor. 11:26) is offered every Sunday. “Mass” is derived from the same root as our word for “Mess Hall”. Far from idolatrous or superstitious, it basically means “Holy Meal.”

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Above: Bringing the Oblation of bread and wine to the Altar in England.

Yet there is something sacrificial about it too. Indeed, those Christians who spoke Jesus’ very own mother-tongue, Aramaic, always called this ritual Qurbono (Offering) Qadisho (HOLY), the Holy Oblation. Similarly, Anglicans call it a “Sacrifice of Praise and Thanksgiving” offering “our selves, our souls and bodies, to be a reasonable, holy, and living sacrifice”. Far from sacrificing Christ all over again, more fittingly, He gives Himself to us sacramentally and faithfully, in the midst of our Faith and Repentance. By the invocation of the Holy Spirit and by Christ’s own Words, we there in that bread and wine receive the “benefits of His passion” (that “one oblation of Himself once offered”) and become “partakers of His most blessed Body and Blood.”

Some churches near us feel strongly that a believer should receive the Holy Spirit.

We agree! And we maintain the ancient Christian rite of Laying on of Hands in Holy Confirmation. In this, a bishop, who has had hands laid upon him by those who have successively had hands laid upon them all the way back to those first Apostles at Pentecost, himself lays hands on believers. This is after those persons publicly profess, “I do,” when asked, “Do ye promise to follow Jesus Christ as your Lord and Saviour?” The Bishop then prays, “Strengthen them, we beseech thee, O Lord, with the Holy Ghost, the Comforter, and daily increase them in thy manifold gifts of grace: the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and ghostly strength, the spirit of knowledge and true godliness; and fill them . . . with the spirit of holy fear . . .”

Some churches near us believe that congregations should maintain the divine ordinance of foot washing.

We agree! And recognize that the Church of God has maintained this custom throughout the centuries. It is noted that in Celtic monasteries, the Abbot would wash the feet of each visitor when one first arrived. Historically, foot washing is observed on the Thursday prior to “Easter” or “Pascha,” the annual celebration of our Lord’s Resurrection.

Coming to St. Peter the Apostle it might appear very foreign to those from American “Protestant” churches. Such bewilderment only goes to show how much things have changed from that “Old Time Religion” as many leaders of the Reformation understood it. Observe the picture below of the first “Protestant” service in what is now Berlin, Germany

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But you celebrate Saints’ Days…

Yes, and so did the first Lutherans, in which it was directed: “festivals, like Sundays and various other festival days should be observed according to the custom of each parish, for the people must have a certain appointed time when they may assemble themselves for the hearing of God’s Word. . . . It would be well that all should unanimously celebrate Sundays, the Annunciation, Purification, and Visitation of the pure Virgin Mary, St. John the Baptist, St. Michael, the Apostles, St. Magdalene . . .” (“Instructions for the Visitors of 1528”). And such the Anglican Church has ever had in her Prayer Book. Even Dutch and German Reformed churches continued to celebrate the “Five Evangelical Feasts” of Christmas, Good Friday, Easter, Ascension and Pentecost.

And you say the “Hail Mary”…

Yes, but these are simply words of Scripture. It was repeated often in the ancient liturgies of the Church and, as a matter of fact, was a part of the Reformer Zwingli’s own liturgy written in 1525, which he composed for the Christians of Zurich; Luther wrote an explanation of it and Henry VIII authorized its use. The final part, “Holy Mary, Mother of God, Prayer for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death” is a new addition and more controversial. Nevertheless, those words were first published and printed in a prayer book by the great Italian preacher, Savanarola, just a couple decades prior to the Reformation. He was himself considered a reformer and was burned at the stake by a Pope. These last words are said by the congregation, voluntarily, and no one is required to say them who is uncomfortable with them.

There is a “Crucifix” above your “Altar”…

This is true. And if you return to many of the Protestant churches of Germany, Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland, you will find that they never removed the beautiful “reredos” (which adorned the backdrop of their altars) complete with pictures of angels, saints, as well as a crucifix. In fact, the plain brass cross which is common in many American Protestant churches was considered controversial and “Catholic” in its day. Yet both the plain cross and the crucifix are perfectly permissible and “Protestant”. And, just to make the matter plainer, you will even find that there are monasteries in Germany and Scandinavia which are “Protestant” and have continued and flourished for centuries, both before and after the Reformation.

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“High Mass” in the “Protestant” Church of Sweden

You also wear “vestments”… and chant prayers

This is also true. Both the “chasuble” and “cope”, however, were the distinctive and required garments of the ministers of the Church of England after the Reformation, as before it. It was not until subsequent attacks upon those vestments by the Puritans that just an academic gown began to be worn. It was also so in Germany and Scandinavia. For many centuries, the Church of Sweden, as well as the Church of Denmark and Norway, have worn the “chasuble” when celebrating Holy Communion and, as these are expensive, well-made and last for centuries, there are possibly parishes in Sweden which are still wearing the chasubles that they were wearing before the Reformation! Practically, all of the early Protestant services included settings to sing, and chant, the words and prayers. This has continued for centuries. Norwegian Americans in the 19th century, for instance, would have thought it strange if their pastor didn’t chant the prayers.

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“Protestant” service in Koenigsburg, Germany

St. Peter the Apostle is a parish of the Diocese of the Mid Atlantic States of the Anglican Catholic Church. The Anglican Catholic Church is a branch of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church, instituted by Jesus Christ, faithfully continuing the Anglican tradition. We uphold the historic Catholic Faith, Apostolic Order and Evangelical Witness as set forth in the traditional Book of Common Prayer. We accept as binding the received Faith and Traditions of the Church, and its teachings.

There are Seven Sacraments: Baptism, Holy Communion, Confirmation, Penance, Unction, Marriage and Holy Orders. The Anglican Catholic Church uses the historic Book of Common Prayer (1928 Edition). This book represents one of the finest collections of Christian wisdom and devotion, more than 75% of it is taken directly from Holy Scriptures.

Anglican Catholics take seriously our Lord’s call to all Christians to serve Him, not only in the Christian community, but in the world.

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The famous photograph dubbed the “Fond du Lac Circus,” in which the “Protestant Episcopal” Diocese of Fond du Lac in 1900 consecrated Bishop Weller to continue the Anglican Catholic tradition in Christ’s One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. In attendance are Russian Orthodox and Polish National Catholic prelates and clergy. Two of the Russian Clergy, St. Tikhon of Moscow, then Bishop of Alaska and the Aleutians, and St. John Kochurov are canonized and venerated by the Orthodox Church, the latter becoming the first martyr killed by the Bolsheviks in 1917.